Category Archives: Opioids

Fighting the Drug Epidemic

Most communities across New Hampshire have been touched by the opioid crisis that’s taken the lives of more than 400 Granite Staters last year, a majority from heroin and fentanyl.21789-113979.jpg

But one place in the Lakes Region stands out not for its significantly high overdose numbers but rather how its community is responding

If you’re doing something illegal, the last person you’d willingly call is probably the police. Well that’s not always the case in Laconia – at least when it comes to using drugs.

“What do I do? My dealer is blowing up my phone, it’s driving me crazy. What do I do?,” said Police Officer Eric Adams, who was talking about one of the many calls he gets at all hours from those battling a drug addiction in the community. Read the entire article HERE. 

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Narrow Indication for Abuse-Deterrent Morphine

The latest opioid approved by FDA will be “expected” to reduce abuse by only one route — injection — in its official labeling.

In a carefully-worded press release, drugmaker Egalet said its extended-release morphine drug Arymo ER “increased resistance to cutting, crushing, grinding or breaking using a variety of tools. Due to its physical and chemical properties, Arymo ER is expected to make abuse by injection difficult.” 1pillst

In an FDA advisory committee meeting last year, participants voted that the drug could deter abuse via the oral, nasal, and intravenous routes of abuse. But there were several reasons only the intravenous route won labeling.

An FDA spokesperson told MedPage Today that MorphaBond, another morphine product, has “marketing exclusivity for labeling describing the expected reduction of abuse of single-entity, extended-release morphine by the intranasal route due to physicochemical properties.” MORE HERE

Teen brain, brain injury, and addiction

These days, when there are news reports about traumatic brain injury (TBI), it’s almost always related to football. And while one of the effects of TBI is an increased risk of using drugs and alcohol (especially for teens), this post isn’t really about that (but this post is).

This post is about the turf TBIs and drugs share—the developing teen brain. healing-art-brain

The Developing Teen Brain—What Makes It Special Puts You at Risk

We’ve talked a lot about why drug use is so dangerous in your teen years—that it raises your risk for being addicted. (Here’s a great explanation.) The teen brain is still developing—growing. This makes it more flexible, more impressionable; so what you do now has a big impact on who you become as an adult. Like clay being molded before it hardens, like a computer being programmed, you are wiring your brain.

Read more HERE.